Going digital to save Taylor & Francis 150 hours a week

“Our e-copyright system was a relatively simple idea that required some fairly complicated problem-solving to make a reality. We worked side-by-side with True Clarity throughout the process to make sure the product we ended up with didn’t limit our flexibility. We appreciated the willingness of True Clarity to have people doing the development work available to us throughout the process. ”

Edward A. Cilurso Vice President – Production

Taylor & Francis Group are one of the world’s leading publishers, releasing over 2,100 journals and 4,000 books annually, with a backlist in excess of 60,000 specialist titles.

What was needed

Taylor and Francis (T&F) have to handle around 250,000 copyright agreements annually in order to publish articles on their site. Getting these agreed involved a lengthy process of emailing out forms, toing and froing through lots of amends and relying on scanning, faxing and emails to log author’s approvals electronically. The business case was crying out for moving this process online, in order to eliminate the pain for authors and staff, save time and keep up with the competition’s online offering.

How we tackled it

Prototypes and early delivery

We kicked off with a discovery phase, involving a few workshops and sessions to completely map out the process, then put together some flow charts to illustrate how we would automate the copyright process. At this stage we carried out some proto-types to validate the approaches, flesh out the unknowns and start delivering to T&F as early as possible in the project. Beyond the author approval on-site, we also needed to map out the integration points with internal legacy sites, such as the production and content management system, and map out some complex workflows to keep the site as self-sufficient as possible.

Designed for Flexibility

The site was designed to present the author with a set of questions, which dynamically change based on their response. The outcome is then used to generate a personalised version of the copyright agreement for the author to agree and submit. Key to this project was to ensure migrating the process online didn’t take away the flexibility of the manual process, so we worked with T&F to create a sophisticated back end allowing T&F to define the routing of questions and answers used to generate the copyright agreements. We also created a number of customisable email templates sent out for different statuses, including reminders for authors who may not have completed an agreement after X amount of time.

The Value

Copyright agreements turned around much faster

T&F sent out 193 author publishing agreements upon launch. 118 were approved within a week, with the vast majority clicking standard options, requiring no further intervention from T&F and minimal enquiries. The approval of 118 licenses would have averaged a longer turnaround, with inspection of each form, using the old process.

Saving staff time on menial tasks

T&F are able to compile detailed weekly reports from the author approval system based on the current status of manuscripts, licenses assigned per country and APAs completed by day. T&F have calculated from the initial launch stats that the new system will save them up to 150 man hours per week – the equivalent of four full-time staff members.

I can’t use CAPTCHA – does that mean I’m not a human?

Am I alone in absolutely hating any form that makes me fill out CAPTCHA?  I consider myself an intelligent, literate person but struggle to read the strange words and numbers that CAPTCHA presents me with.  I wonder how many people fail to complete forms simply because of these horrible barriers?

One of our teams was pondering this problem the other week and came across this nifty alternative for people to prove they are in fact humans.  http://www.areyouahuman.com/.

I absolutely love this and think it’s a much better alternative and likely to make people fill in forms lots just to play another game – they quote a 40% increase in completions – a marketing dream!!

We’re going to be offering this alternative to CAPTCHA to our clients in the future so if this is something you’d like to see on your website, please let us know.  Works on mobiles and with flash or HTML5 and claims good reliability and scalability so looks like a safe option.

One last thing – do read the instructions on the games carefully – I initially struggled trying to put non-food objects in the fridge and to pin flying objects to the ground.  Clearly I’m not as intelligent as I’d like to think I am!